kecobe:


Théophile Alexandre Steinlen (Swiss; 1859–1923 )Chats = Cats Lithograph on paper mounted on cardboard, 1896Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux, France © Musée des Beaux-Arts – Mairie de Bordeaux. Photo: L. Gauthier, F. Deval

kecobe:

Théophile Alexandre Steinlen (Swiss; 1859–1923 )
Chats = Cats
Lithograph on paper mounted on cardboard, 1896
Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux, France
© Musée des Beaux-Arts – Mairie de Bordeaux. Photo: L. Gauthier, F. Deval

♥ 339 — 13 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via bromeranian (source)

sexhaver:

Bernard Tschumi, Advertisements for Architecture (1976-1977)

♥ 923 — 15 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via sexhaver

Blue Mosque, Istanbul

Blue Mosque, Istanbul

♥ 60156 — 16 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via snowcowangel (source)

whorchacha:

Starry Night (detail)
Vincent Van Gogh
Oil on canvas, 1889

♥ 21243 — 17 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via carswinky (source)
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secretlesbians:

Depictions of Lesbianism by Henri Toulouse Lautrec

During his life, Lautrec spent a lot of time in Montmarte, the bohemian centre of 19th century Paris and home to artists, philosophers, writers, performers, and prostitutes. He spent a lot of time with the sex workers there, and discovered that many of them had intimate relationships with one another.

Lautrec’s depiction of lesbianism is particularly notable because it doesn’t fetishise sexual intimacy between women or present it as spectacle for the male gaze. Lautrec was trying to capture small, tender moments in the lives of the women he met, and he did so with humanity and sensitivity. In a world of constructed sexuality and fantasy, he finds the real relationships, and reveals to us the hidden lives of queer women in the 19th century.

Fin-de-siècle Paris was the capital of lesbianism. However, until the mid century, and despite the acknowledgment of male homosexuality, female homosexuality had been considered absurd. This scepticism was grounded in the fact that many nineteenth-century psychologists and medical professionals did not believe in female sexual impulse. Thus, when instances of lesbianism were reported in Alexandre Parent-Duchâtelet’s 1836 study of prostitution in Paris, lesbianism came to be understood as an activity associated with the Montmartre counterculture and, in particular, with prostitution. Indeed, deluxe houses of tolerance often functioned as specialty brothels that catered for a clientele with particular fetishes, such as tableaux vivants where ‘inmates, entirely naked, abandon themselves to homosexual practices on a large black velvet carpet or in rooms hung with black satin to bring out the whiteness of their bodies’. This was lesbianism as commercial spectacle, performed within a closed environment for male consumption.

Lesbianism in the public realm was a sexual preference that, while common, was negatively judged by French conservative society and for this reason was conducted with subtlety and partially obscured. In fact, many of the biggest stars of the Parisian circuses, dance halls and café-concerts were lesbian or bisexual, including Jane Avril and May Milton (whom, it is generally agreed, had a short-lived love affair), Sarah Bernhardt, Cha-u-ka-o and La Goulue. Whilst these Montmartre celebrities were depicted on multiple occasions by Lautrec, the artist chose to represent them as skilled professionals, never exploiting their sexual preference as the main focus of his compositions. So subtle was Lautrec in his treatment of these themes that art historians such as David Sweetman have gone so far as to argue that ‘It comes as something of a shock to realise that most of the women … were in fact lesbians and that quite a few were lovers. So many, in fact, that it is possible to argue that lesbianism is the hidden subtext of much of the art of Henri’s mature years.’

- from nga.gov.au

Images shown:

1. At the Moulin Rouge: The Women Dancing

2. In Bed

3. The Kiss

4. Two Friends

5. Les Deux Amies

♥ 2039 — 19 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via martinfreeman (source)
art-yeti:

J.M.W Turner, Oxford, Trinity College; 1837-1840

art-yeti:

J.M.W Turner, Oxford, Trinity College; 1837-1840

♥ 80 — 19 hours ago on 21 Oct 2014 — via gattamelata (source)
cauldronandcross:

Book Cover by Roger of Helmarshausen ca.1100-10 

cauldronandcross:

Book Cover by Roger of Helmarshausen ca.1100-10 

♥ 1174 — 1 day ago on 20 Oct 2014 — via snowcowangel (source)

europeansculpture:

Camille Claudel (1864-1943) - L’Aurore, Marbre, vers 1898-1900 ?

♥ 49 — 1 day ago on 20 Oct 2014 — via gattamelata (source)
artingeneral:

It was the year he began to wonder about the noise that colors make. Roses came roaring across the garden at him. He lay on his bed at night listening to the silver light of stars crashing against the window screen. Most of those he interviewed for the science project had to admit they did not hear the cries of the roses being burned alive in the noonday sun. Like horses, Geryon would say helpfully, like horses in war.
 
Image: Cy Twombly. Untitled (Bassano in Teverina), 1985. Acrylic, oil paint, spray paint on wooden panel, 181.7 x 181.7 cm
Text Excerpt: Carson, Anne. Autobiography of Red: A Novel in Verse. New York: Vintage Contemporaries, 1999. Print.
 

artingeneral:

It was the year he began to wonder about the noise that colors make. 
Roses came roaring across the garden at him. 
He lay on his bed at night listening to the silver light of stars crashing against the window screen. 
Most of those he interviewed for the science project had to admit they did not hear the cries of the roses being burned alive in the noonday sun. 
Like horses, Geryon would say helpfully, like horses in war.

 

Image: Cy Twombly. Untitled (Bassano in Teverina), 1985. Acrylic, oil paint, spray paint on wooden panel, 181.7 x 181.7 cm

Text Excerpt: Carson, Anne. Autobiography of Red: A Novel in Verse. New York: Vintage Contemporaries, 1999. Print.

 

♥ 143 — 1 day ago on 20 Oct 2014 — via cuntbible (source)
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bbww:

John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art; 1971

bbww:

John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art; 1971

♥ 7075 — 1 day ago on 20 Oct 2014 — via alvangs (source)
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